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Sawyer's View Master 3D viewer (Model C)

Item is a handheld plastic black Model C View-Master 3D viewer manufactured by Sawyer's Inc. from the mid-1940's to mid-1950's. This model was the first of its kind to have a slot for reels to be placed in for viewing. The metal lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. First, reels are inserted through the top of the viewer. Next, user would look through binocular eye holes to see a three dimensional image. View-Master can be used with ambient light. The light attachment bulb came as a later edition for the View-Master Model C. Attachment was screwed onto viewer with push down red button that switches bulb on and off. Item also comes with 1 reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm black and white transparencies of World War 2 battle scenes.

Written on object : Sawyer's View-Master Reg.US.PAT.OFF. U.S. Pat. 2189.285. Can.PAT.406893 Brit.PAT.538492 Other PAT. PEND. Made in U.S.A. Portland-ORE.

3D stereobox stereoscopic viewer

Item is a green plastic view master with original box packaging. Three-dimensional colour transparency reel depicts frontier puppets. Reels are interchangeable. Reels are inserted into the top of the view master and switched by the plastic push down lever on the side.

Stereo Realist Viewer

Item is made of black bakelite with red buttons and knobs. It has double element glass (achromat) lenses, interocular adjustment, and a dial for focus. It takes the Realist format slide (slide outside dimensions 1-5/8 x 4 inches) and has a slit to put these slides in.

View-Master Stereoscope with stereo reels

Item consists of a View-Master Stereoscope manufactured by Sawyers Inc., with 18 reels, and a View-Master Reel List catalogue of available View-Master reels, dated September, 1951.

Sawyers first introduced the Stereoscope at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). The 3D viewer is made of plastic and metal. Reel shows 7 diametrical, 16 mm kodachrome transparencies of famous global landmarks, characters from popular culture, major events etc. The push-down lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time. Reels are interchangeable and come with a variety of themes often ordered through a View-Master catalogue.

Reels included are as follows:

111 Redwood Highway 1 California USA
186 Palm Springs California USA
188 Santa Barbara California USA
189 San Juan Capistrano Mission California USA
219 Holywood California USA
221 Los Angeles California USA
222 Tournament of Roses Pasadena California, USA
220 Homes of Movie Stars Hollywood California USA
289 Desert Cactus in Bloom
405-407 The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II (3 reels, with story booklet)
710 Firefighters in Action (with story booklet)
800 Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd the Hunter
810 Tom and Jerry in the Cat Trapper
945 Roy Rogers King of the Cowboys & "Trigger"
950 Gene Autrey and His Wonder Horse "Champion"
960 Cisco Kid (Duncan Renaldo) and Pancho (Leo Carrillo)
Sam 1 - Adventure of Sam Sawyer: Sam Flies to the Moon (with story booklet)

Stereoscopic Cameras

Series consists of 17 cameras designed to take identical images of the same subject from two lenses, approximately 2.5 inches apart or the same distance between human eyes. Cameras are able to make stereo pairs or single images. Cameras in this series range between ca.1850 and ca.1996.

The stereoscope was invented by Charles Wheatstone in 1838 to demonstrate binocular vision and its role in depth perception. Wheatstone used a pair of drawings to show how each eye could see a slight difference in each image, until the single images are superimposed onto each other through a stereoscope, revealing a three-dimensional effect. With the later establishment of photography, creation of Sir David Brewster's portable stereoscope in 1894 and the introduction of the wet-plate collodion process in 1851, did the stereoscopic industry rise to popularity.

Prior to the development of stereo-cameras, a single camera was used to produce either two daguerreotypes or calotypes in succession. The camera would be moved a few inches to one side between exposures in an attempt to produce pictures that looked identical or what was seen by the two eyes. However, this method was based off trial and error, as the quality of the three-dimensional effect might have been compromised by inadequate distance between exposures or alteration of camera angle, subject, and lighting conditions.

The two basic camera types designed to produce stereoscopic pairs are the single-lensed and double-lensed cameras. The double-lensed or binocular cameras allowed photographers to make simultaneous exposures for more accurate stereo photographs. The increasing demand for stereo imagery called for more portable cameras. Field cameras that folded to a compact size enabled photographers to leave the studio and produce stereos outdoors or previously inaccessible places. Later camera designs would have a standard format of 23x 24 mm with a focal length of 35mm and faster shutter speeds.

3D binocular viewfinder camera (Coronet)

Item is a plastic stereo camera typically found through mail order catalogues. For 4.5 x 5 cm exposures on 127 mm roll film. Shutter speed 1/50. Twin f11 menscus fixed focal lenses. Lens are labelled as 1 and 2. Written on item: Bioncular viewfinder patents applied for, coronet 3-D, present use 127 film, to take 8 picture close cover blase over No.1 lens make exposures on every number from 1 to 8, to take 4 pairs stereo picture open cover blase over no.1 lens. make exposures only on odd numbers (1, 3, 5 and 7), use no. 127 roll film.

3D single use camera (ImageTech)

Item is a single-use 3D camera with original film and box. Camera comes with shutter release, view finder, triple lens, exposure counter and film advance thumbwheel. Item uses high resolution colour film. Prints are processed at manufacturer then sent back to user, as a result the camera comes with self-addressed envelope to the ImageTech processing centre.

Nimslo 3D 35mm camera (Nimslo)

Item is a three-dimensional 35 mm camera made by Nimslo. Item produces 3-dimensional colour pictures with 100 or 400 ASA speeds, is fully automatic, compact and lightweight, comes with four pre-focused glass lenses, additional flash, and all original instructions. Item comes in original box with 5 film strip negatives rejected from Nimslo printing centre. Film strips would be sent by users to the Nimslo printing centre where Nimslo would complete the printing process. Written on box : Product and/or photographic process covered by one or more of U.S. patents No. 3960563, No. 4037950, No. 4086585, No. D264343, Other Patents Pending.

Stereo brownie (No.2)

Item is a Stereo Brownie camera manufactured by Kodak with a retractable front. Item is automatic with a push down button that unlatches the front cover revealing the camera. This object was designed to take two nearly identical pairs of images often referred to as stereographs. Written on object : patents pending, made by Eastman Kodak Co. Rochester, N.Y, U.S.A.

Stereographs, by subject

Series contains a wide range of stereoscopic photographs, often referred to as stereocards or stereographs. Depictions include a variety of people, places, and objects. In cases where items are part of a series, attempts have been made to arrange them together. Subject terms have been used to indicate contextual relationships.

Stereographs, Leisure

File contains a group of stereographs that depict scenes of people engaged in leisure and sporting events (swimming, bullfighting, circus).

5 Stereoscopic Photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman
8 Stereoscopic Photographs by Underwood & Underwood
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by J. F. Jarvis
6 Stereoscopic Photographs by Keystone View Co.
2 Stereoscopic Photographs by Kilburn Brothers
5 Stereoscopic Photographs by H. C. White Co.
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by Carlyle
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by T. Eaton Co.
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by F. F. Doherty
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by Ingersoll View Co.
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by John A. Larrabee
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by Liberty Brand-Stereo Views
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by S. F. Adams
1 Stereoscopic photograph by W. Tylar
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Young People's Missionary Movement
26 Stereoscopic Photographs by unidentified publishers

Stereographs, General Recurring Events

File consists of stereographs depicting general events and reoccurring holidays such as Christmas, New Year's Thanksgiving, and Centennial Celebrations.

10 Stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
7 Stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers, in association with James M. Davis
5 Stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood
3 Stereoscopic photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Whiting View Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Littleton View Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Griffith & Griffith
1 Stereoscopic photograph by H. C. White Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Geo. Barker
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Dominion Stereoscopic Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by Chas. Pollock
1 Stereoscopic photograph by F. G. Weller
5 Stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers

Stereographs, Controversial Series

File consists of stereographs depicting themes that are racist, violent, or otherwise problematic, such as animal abuse, violence against children, and racial caricatures.

10 Stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood
6 Stereoscopic photographs by Littleton View Co
3 Stereoscopic photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman
6 Stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers

Stereographs, Italy/Vatican City

File consists of stereographs and stereographic sets depicting various locations, buildings, and monuments in Italy and Vatican City.

22 stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood.
15 stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
6 stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers; 10 stereoscopic photographs in association with James M. Davis.
3 stereoscopic photographs by Universal View Co.
8 stereoscopic photographs by J.F. Jarvis Publishers.
2 stereoscopic photographs by Geo. W. Griffith.
2 stereoscopic photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman Publishers.
1 stereoscopic photograph by L. Suscipj.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Perrin & Griswold.
3 stereoscopic photograph by Giorgio Sommer.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Giorgio Conrad.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Giovanni Brampton Philpot.
1 stereoscopic photograph by M.J. Morse.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Naya.
2 stereoscopic photograph by H. C. White Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Littleton View Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by C.P. Venizia.
1 stereoscopic photograph by E. Nesemann.
1 stereoscopic photograph by The Fine Art Photographer's Publishing Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Giacomo Brogi.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Fratelli Alinari.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Felice Crespi.
1 stereoscopic photograph by The London Stereoscopic Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Maccilo.
57 stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers
1 series of stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood on Italy(Series #1)
1 series of stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood on Rome(Series #2)

Stereographs, Egypt

File consists of stereographs depicting various locations, buildings, and monuments in Egypt, such as Pyramids, and Ships.

15 stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
2 stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers; 5 stereoscopic photographs in association with James M. Davis.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Benjn Pike Jr.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Universal View Co.
2 stereoscopic photographs by W. Hammersmith
6 stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood.
3 stereoscopic photographs by J. F. Jarvis Publishers.
2 stereoscopic photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman.
1 stereoscopic photograph by The Fine Art Photographers' Publishing Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Frank M. Good.
10 stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers

Stereographs, Palestine &Israel

File consists of stereographs and stereoscopic sets depicting various locations, buildings and monuments in Palestine and Israel, such as scenery, and buildings.

36 stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood.
17 stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
16 stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers in association with James M. Davis
4 stereoscopic photographs by F. J. Jarvis.
4 stereoscopic photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman
2 stereoscopic photographs by C. Bierstadt.
2 stereoscopic photographs by Universal View Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by W. J. Wilcox
1 stereoscopic photograph by Universal Photo Art Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Webster & Albee
1 stereoscopic photograph by H. C. White Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by L. D. & Co.
2 stereoscopic photographs by T. W. Ingersoll
20 stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers
3 series by Underwood & Underwood
1 series by Stereo-Travel Co.

Stereographs, Arctic, Antarctica & Greenland

File consists of stereographs depicting scenery and scenes from the Arctic, Antarctica, and Greenland, such as hunting, snow, and ice.

6 stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by the American Stereoscopic Company
1 stereoscopic photograph by Underwood & Underwood

Stereographs, Russia

File consists of stereographs depicting various locations, buildings, and monuments in Russia, such as fountains, mountains, monuments, and the Peterhof Palace.

9 stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
9 stereoscopic photographs by J.F. Jarvis
2 stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood
2 stereoscopic photographs by H.C. White Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Kilburn Brothers, in association with James M. Davis
6 stereoscopic photographs by an unidentified publisher
1 series called "Japan and Russian Views" by an unidentified publisher

Stereographs, Caribbean Islands (Cuba, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, & Saint Vincent and the Grenadines)

File consists of stereographs depicting scenes, famous locations, and structures from islands in the Carribean, such as castles, plantations, gardens, lakes, and floods.

3 stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood
4 stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Strohmeyer & Wyman
1 stereoscopic photograph by Universal View Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by Quaker Oats Co.
2 stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers

Stereographs, Monaco

File consists of stereographs depicting scenes, famous locations, and structures in Monaco, such as cityscapes, castles, and casinos.

1 stereoscopic photograph by Keystone View Company
5 stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers, in association with James M. Davis
2 stereoscopic photographs by Universal View Co.
1 stereoscopic photograph by J.F. Jarvis
1 stereoscopic photograph by L. L.
1 stereoscopic photograph by T. W. Ingersoll
3 stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers

Stereographs, Unidentified Locations

File consists of stereographs, depicting scenes, famous locations, and structures from unidentified locations.

10 Stereoscopic Photographs by Robinson
3 Stereoscopic Photographs by W. Notman
2 Stereoscopic Photographs by Webster & Albee
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by W. Kilburn
1 Stereoscopic Photograph by R. O. P.
58 Stereoscopic Photographs by Unidentified Publishers

Stereographs, large sets

File consists of narrative series' of stereographs that depicting story-lines through tableau. Most stories are comedic, heart-warming, or sarcastic in nature, often focused on domestic topics. Many popular series were either recreated or sold, reprinted, and marketed by different companies. Some of the photographic series in the file are incomplete.

Stories include:

Wedding series:
23 stereographs, B.W. Kilburn (James M. Davis Publishers), n.d.
9 stereographs, The 'Perfec' Stereograph (H.C. White), 1902
24 stereographs, Underwood and Underwood, 1903
12 stereographs, Universal View Company (William H. Raw), 1903
7 stereographs, no publisher (reproductions), n.d.
12 stereographs, no publisher (bound reproductions), n.d.
25 stereographs, no publisher (hand-coloured, boxed reproductions), n.d.

The New Cook Series:
21 stereographs, Griffith & Griffith, 1901
6 stereographs, International View Co. (copyright C. L. Wasson). 1901
10 stereographs, Keystone View Company, n.d.
1 stereograph, Sterro Photo Co.,
16 stereographs, Underwood & Underwood, 1900
2 stereographs, Universal View Company (William H. Raw), 1902
15 stereographs, no publisher (hand-coloured reproductions), n.d.

French maid Series:
12 stereographs, American Stereoscopic Co., 1903
2 stereographs Keystone View Co., n.d.
12 stereographs, The "Perfec" Stereograph (H.C. White), 1902

The New Secretary:
5 stereographs, Keystone View Co., n.d.
12 stereographs, Underwood & Underwood, 1899

How Biddy Served the Tomatoes:
1 stereograph, Griffith & Griffith, 1900
3 stereographs, Keystone View Co. (B. L. Singley), 1900
4 stereographs, B.W. Kilburn, n.d.
3 stereographs, Underwood & Underwood (Strohmeyer & Wyman), 1897
1 stereograph, Universal Photo Arts Co. (C.H. Graves), 1897

A Sodier's Return series:
11 stereographs, Underwod & Underwood, 1900

The "New Woman" series:
2 stereographs, B.W. Kilburn (James M. David), 1897
2 stereographs, Keystone View Company, 1899
2 stereographs, Underwood & Underwood (Strohmeyer & Wyman), 1897
1 stereograph, American Photo Company, n.d.
1 stereograph, International Stereoscopic View Co., n.d.
1 stereograph, Universal Photo Arts Co. (C.H. Graves), 1900
1 stereograph, Webster & Albee, n.d.
1 stereograph, The Whiting View Company, n.d.
4 stereographs, no publisher, n.d.

The First Balkan War
22 stereographs, J. Hollinger (reproductions), n.d.

Stereographs, short and incomplete sets

File consists of narrative series' of stereographs that depicting story-lines through tableau. Most stories are comedic, heart-warming, or sarcastic in nature, often focused on domestic topics. Many popular series were either recreated or sold, reprinted and marketed by different companies. Some of the photographic series in the file are incomplete.

The series that are included are:

31 Stereoscopic photographs by Keystone View Co.
-Pickwick series
-Before and after marriage
-No place like home
-Stealing Apples
-Lovers
-Wedding presents
-Character sketches (Lovers)
-Reuban & Samantha (country folk)
-Dear Jack, it's awfully slow here

14 Stereoscopic photographs by Universal Photo Art Co.
-Reuben calls on his city cousins
-Milk maid
-Policeman on his regular beat
-Man under bed

7 Stereoscopic photographs by W. B. Sherk

11 Stereoscopic photographs by Universal View Co.
-Home late
-Dueling women
-A good story
-The barbershop
-Maid

27 Stereoscopic photographs by Perfec Stereograph (H. C. White Co.)
-Mr. Slight and Miss Hevywayt
-Harmony of married life
-Pesky mother-in-law
-Catching sister in the act
-Ladies dorm room
-Freshman

2 Stereoscopic photographs by Melander
-A good place to paint a face

2 Stereoscopic photographs by F. G. Weller
-Just before/after the battle
-An electric hobby/An effectual remedy

2 Stereoscopic photographs by Roberts & Fellows
-Mr. Jones, remove your hat

2 Stereoscopic photographs by International View Co.
-Maiden's fair try donkey riding

39 Stereoscopic photographs by Underwood & Underwood
-Married mans trouble
-Eavesdroppers
-Mickie O'Hoolihan's wake
-two are company
-Shoulder arts
-This is a fine make up for the masquerade
-Greatness
-Won't you come and sit on my lap?
-Misteltoe
-Floor walker by day and night
-The Hallowe'en party
-Art
-The five senses
-Have you "Kissed me by mood light" Sir?
-Tricks in the old country school
-The amateur's first attempt
-Pickwick
-Why doesn't he go
-His unhappy predicament

4 Stereoscopic photographs by Kilburn Brothers, 11 in association with James M. Davis
-Why don't you get up and help me
-Love and jealousy
-Fire! Fire!
-Tooth pulling
-Miss Milliner
-How dare you betray my confidence
-They are sound asleep

2 Stereoscopic photographs by Berry, Kelley & Chadwick,
-Planning for the future

4 separately by E. W. Kelley
-The only man

10 Stereoscopic photographs by Littleton View Co.
7 Stereoscopic photographs by Strohmeyer & Wyman
5 Stereoscopic photographs by James A. Hurst
5 Stereoscopic photographs by Webster & Albee
-Maid
-[Caught in the act]

2 Stereoscopic photographs by American Stereoscopic Co.
1 Stereoscopic photograph by J. P. Soule
10 Stereoscopic photographs by Herman Knutzen
-[Chellist]
-The industrious painter and the idle apprentice

30 Stereoscopic photographs by unidentified publishers
-The hero's wife
-[Broken seesaw]
-Room on top
-[Woman in a cake]
-Toothache

  • The barber shop
    -The book agent
    -The fisherman
    -[Bill, sick cowboy]

Self-Published Stereographs (Single-Sided)

File contains double-sided stereographs (with images on both sides of the card) that depict buildings, animals and people at the beach, a lake, a creek bank, an island in the middle of a lake with a person on it a street scene, an Indigenous Person and Paul Wing Jr.

Business cards

The first business card is for Martin and Gail Bass and provides their address and telephone number and states their interest in Stereoscopic Cards and viewers. The second card is for John Steffen, who heads Eastview Pharmacy, and lists his address and telephone number and his interest in stereoscopic viewers.

Box of Glass Slides - Kromskop Viewer Set, Kromograms

File contains a stereoscopic viewer and set of Kromogram stereoscopic images. A Kromogram was produced by a special camera and viewed through a Kromoscop.
The Kromskop is a stereoscopic viewer which combined the images from six black and white transparencies through colour filters to create a stereoscopic colour image. The six black and white transparencies were connected together in such a way that they could be 'draped' over the viewer. The set of six transparencies is called a Kromogrram.
To produce a Kromogram, the special camera took three pairs of images of a given object (an exposure time of a minute was required, which made it impractical for portrait work). It used a combination of mirrors, prisms and colour filters. The eventual positive was cut into three and mounted in a folded cardboard frame to form the Kromogram.
The three pairs of transparencies were black and white. However they differed in detail because they showed different features of the subject as transmitted through the particular colour filter.
The label on the box reads: "The Photochromoscope Syndicate, Limited, / 121, Shaftesbury Avenue, London W.C." The Syndicate, a British company, was established by Ives in 1898.
Kromogram consists of three black and white negatives made of one subject and there are four sets of three. One set focuses on botanical gardens/flowers, another on a vase of flowers, one on a Yorkshire farm and the last on two people sitting and reading.

Star Trek, View-master Reel

Item consists of a set of wheel type stereographs that depict scenes from the Star Trek original series episode "The Omega Glory" (season 2, episode 23). The back of the envelope summarizes the episode. Packet item No. B 4991.

Flintstones, View-master Reel

File consists of two sets of wheel type stereographs that depict scenes from The Flintstones cartoon television series. On each envelope back, there is a summary of what the wheel shows. One envelope also contains an illustrated booklet. Packet Numbers are B 520 and B 514.

Assorted Series, View-master Reel

File contains a set of wheel type stereographs depicting a veriety of television series including: Gun smoke, Hawai Five-O, Laugh-In, Snoopy, San Diego Zoo, Mexican Bullfight, Coins, Rocks, World War One, and Peanuts.

Assorted Stories, View-master Reel

File consists of a set of wheel type stereographs that depict a variety of well known stories. Titles are: The Fiddler on the Roof, The Poseidon Adventure, Thumbelina, The Pied Piper, Alice in Wonderland, Bambi and Lassie, and Timmy in "The Runaway Mule"

Colorburst 200 Camera

Item is a battery-powered Colourburst 200 instant camera. The camera was produced by Kodak to replace the EK6 and was priced to compete with the Polaroid Pronto! series. It has a tiny electric motor powered by one J‐size battery that is good for a minimum of 10 packs of film. This model also has a low‐light signal that indicates when you should switch to flash, as well as a battery check light.
Colorburst cameras offer a focusing scale around the lens, and a zooming circle in the finder as a focusing aid. This model has an automatic electronic shutters, focus‐linked flash automation, and a sensor that prevents the flash from firing if the safety cover is in place or the film pack is empty

Polaroid J66 Camera

Item is a Polaroid Instant camera with a leather carrying strap and polished steel body, also comes with a model JB flash. It comes with an English manual and a French manual. This camera is the last mass produced instant roll film camera of the Polaroid line and from 1961-1963, it was also the most popular due to its low cost and user friendliness. More than 900,000 were produced and sold at a cost of $89, and now retail for around $10. It was a predecessor of Polaroid`s later film pack cameras. The flash is a built-in hinged tilt-out flashgun for AG-1 bulbs, there is automatic exposure and shutter speeds are controlled by a selenium cell, rather than manually. Serial number is AJ809302.

Polaroid Pathfinder 120 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant folding camera with a leather carrying strap. It comes with a manual. This camera features a Seikosha SLV shutter, 127mm, and a f/4.7, Yashinon lens. Polaroid partnered with Yashica to release the 120 model for the international market. This camera generally sells for around $75. Serial number is AL120237.

Polaroid 160 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a leather carrying strap and usually retails for around $15. It comes with a manual. It uses a M-sync Polaroid hot shoe flash and the lens is a 130 mm element glass f/8.8. The camera has a tripod socket on the bottom and the shutter has 4 speeds 1/12, 1/25, 1/50 and 1/100. Serial number is D549935.

Polaroid Swinger Sentinel Land Camera

Item is a Sentinel instant camera with wrist strap that produces wallet-size photos that must be chemically treated by the user. It comes with a manual. The body is white plastic, the lens is a meniscus, the shutter is set at the single speed of 1/200 second, there is a built-in flashgun for AG-1 bulbs, a fixed focus and an exposure setting assisted via built-in photometer. The camera got its name from the swinging motion it made when users slipped the strap over their wrists and walked with them. Unlike Polaroid`s earlier, more expensive instant cameras, which conveyed the message that they were not toys, the Swinger originally retailed for $19.95, but now usually sells for around $10, and attempted to draw the affluent children of baby boomers. It was also easy to use, with the word YESappearing in the viewfinder when the exposure was correct. In the first two years on the market, approximately five million were sold, but they were rarely used for more than two rolls of film. They are now commonly displayed as an example of Pop Art. Serial number is KC9451A.

Polaroid Swinger II Camera

Item is a Swinger instant camera with wrist strap. The camera got its name from the swinging motion it made when users slipped the strap over their wrists and walked with them. Unlike Polaroid`s earlier, more expensive instant cameras, which conveyed the message that they were not toys, the Swinger originally retailed for $19.95 and attempted to draw the affluent children of baby boomers. It was also easy to use, with the word YESappearing in the viewfinder when the exposure was correct. In the first two years on the market, approximately five million were sold, but they were rarely used for more than two rolls of film. They are now commonly displayed as an example of Pop Art. Serial number is KB9451A.

Folding Pack Film Cameras

Some features are common to all models in the Polaroid 100-400 series, including a folding bellows, automatic exposure and the use of 100 series pack film; two manuals for folding-pack land cameras in VV3. Items in this series are arranged by Camera model

Polaroid 210 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera was the lower end model of the 200 line and is made of plastic. It comes with a manual. The camera originally sold for a list price of $49.95, but now usually sells for around $10. It was the first color-capable Polaroid to sell for under $50.00, and approximately 1,500,000 were produced. Serial number is ZE402564.

Polaroid 350 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a metal body, originally retailing for $149.95, but now selling for around $70. The flash uses and M3 bulb and the camera comes with a Model 268 flash unit, as well as a Polaroid Meter model 625. There is a single window Zeiss Ikon viewfinder, the lens is 3 element glass, a tripod socket, and there is an electronic timer. The aperture control options are f/8.8, f/12.5, f/17.5, f/25, f/35, f/42 and the shutter speed varies from 1/1200 to 10 sec.

Polaroid 360 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a metal body and comes in a display box, with an electronic, rechargeable flash and fast charger(Model 363). The introduction of an electronic flash was new, however they were not automatic and Polaroid had to design a complicated shuttering system to control the output of the flash. As a result, the flash was dropped from future cameras, likely due to the expense. The camera originally sold for $199.95, but now usually retails for around $60. The viewfinder is a single window Zeiss Ikon and the lens is 3 element glass. There is an electronic timer and tripod socket, as well. The aperture control options are: f/8.8, f/12.5, f/17.5, f/25, f/35, f/42 and the shutter speed varies from 1/1200 to 10 sec. Serial number is BU253606.

Countdown 70 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body, it originally sold for $74.95, but now usually sells for around $20. It comes with a Polaroid focused flash and a built-in mechanical timer. Serial number is EX119478.

Polaroid M6 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and wrist strap. It originally retailed for $59.95, but now usually sells for around $20. Estimated production is over 150,000. The lens is 114mm f/8.8 2-element plastic. It has a simple, rigid viewfinder with "image sizer" distance estimator and this viewfinder also has projected framelines and automatic parallax compensation. There is a mechanical development timer. The aperture control is fixed at f/42 and the electronic shutter speeds vary from 1/1200 - 10 sec. Serial number is CHE015GA.

Polaroid Colorpack III Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and wrist strap, originally retailing for $24.95 and now usually retails for around $20. It comes with a manual. Similar to the Colorpack IV, it borrows heavily from the Colorpack II with the addition of a mechanical timer and a focusing aid(missing on cameras of this model sold outside North America). Just as in Colorpack II, electronic shutter with speeds that vary from about 1/500 to 10 sec and aperture control setting are fixed for 75 and 3000 speed films. There is a built-in flashcube socket, with the flashcube automatically rotating after each exposure and a "face sizer" focusing aid for 5 ft. setting. The lens is 114mm, f/9.2 3-element plastic, marking it is a being produced later; certain models had a glass lens. Photos are once again exposed automatically. Serial number is CHB132GA.

Polaroid Colorpack 80 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and wrist strap, that now usually sells for around $20. It comes with a manual. Shutter is automatic and speeds vary from 1/500 to 1 sec. Aperture controls vary based on film: F/9 for standard Polacolor 88, F/60 for standard film 87 (3 000 ASA). Photos are automatically exposed and exposure compensation is manual, through the use of a lighten or darken photographs dial. Flash uses a standard flash-cube. Serial number is HC155A.

Polaroid Square Shooter 2 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and wrist strap, originally retailing for $24.95 and now usually retails for around $10. It comes with a manual. Design of camera borrows heavily from the Polaroid Colorpack II. The lens is 114mm, f/9.2 3-element plastic and there is a built-in flashcube socket, with the flashcube rotating automatically after each picture. The shutter is electronic and speeds range from 1/500 to 10 sec. Photos are exposed automatically. The aperture control option is set for 75 speed film and there is a "face sizer" focusing aid for images within 5 ft. Serial number is TF4241A.

Polaroid Super Shooter Camera Plus

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and wrist strap, that originally retailed for $34.95, but now usually retails for around $20. Very similar to the Colorpack V, with the addition of a built-in development timer. There is an electronic shutter with speeds that vary from about 1/500 to 10 sec and aperture control setting are fixed for 75 and 3000 speed films. There is a built-in flashcube socket, with the flashcube automatically rotating after each exposure and this flash can use either standard or Hi-Power flashcubes. Also comes with a "face sizer" focusing aid for 5 ft. settings and a film warmer, used to help develop the film in cold weather. Photos are exposed automatically. Serial number is TK5231A.

Polaroid Electric Zip (White) Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and wrist strap, that originally retailed for $21.95, but now usually retails for around $20. This low cost meant it was a good starting camera for those who were just beginning to learn about photography. Camera borrows heavily from the Polaroid Colorpack II. There is an electronic shutter with speeds that vary from about 1/500 to 10 sec and aperture control settings are fixed for 75 and 3000 speed films. There is a built-in flashcube socket, with the flashcube automatically rotating after each exposure and a "face sizer" focusing aid for 5 ft. settings. The lens is 114mm, f/9.2 3-element plastic and photos are exposed automatically. It also comes with a manual lighten/darken control. Serial number is TF6181A.

Polaroid Minute Maker Plus Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body, neck strap and back toggle, that originally retailed for $31.95 and now usually retails for around $10. Item borrows heavily from Polaroid Colorpack V (CP5). There is an electronic shutter with speeds that vary from about 1/500 to 10 sec and the aperture control setting is fixed for 75 speed film. There is a built-in flashcube socket, with the flashcube automatically rotating after each exposure and this flash can use either standard or Hi-Power flashcubes. Also comes with a "face sizer" focusing aid for 5 ft. settings. Photos are exposed automatically. Serial number is TC7301A.

Polaroid Minute Maker Plus Camera Special Edition

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and back toggle, that now retails for around $10. Similar to the Polaroid Minute Maker Plus, with the addition of a built-in mechanical development timer. The lens is plastic and the aperture control settings are fixed for 75 and 3000 speed films. There is a built-in flashcube socket and photos are exposed automatically. Serial number is TD7281AA.

Polaroid Pronto! Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap, that originally retailed for $66 and now usually sells for around $10. Camera also comes with an ACME-Lite Model 131 electronic flash. It was another attempt by Polaroid to make their cameras more affordable for the masses and is the first non-folding SX70. Features of the Pronto! include: an electronic shutter and automatic exposure, a three-element, 116 mm f/9.4 plastic lens, and the option to add a flashbar for indoor photos. This model relies heavily on guessing for focusing as users are required to turn the ring around the lens to set the distance from the subject. Serial number is ANG502BA.

Polaroid Pronto! B Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap, that originally retailed for $59 and now sells for around $10. Item comes with a Polatronic Flash unit #8400(has its own manual) and is similar to the original Pronto!. Has an electronic shutter and automatic exposure, a three-element, 116 mm f/9.4 plastic lens that is color-coated, front cell-focusing, and the option to add a flashbar for indoor photos. Serial number is ANJ829BD.

Polaroid Viva Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap. Item comes with three packs of Polaroid Viva Film. Model was produced for the Saudi Arabian Market and the camera was not sold in either Canada or the United States. There is a plastic lens, a manual development timer, and manual exposure control through the lighten and darken switch. Serial number is VF321A.

Polaroid SX70 One Step Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap, that originally retailed for $39.95. Item also comes with a Q-light #2351, that has its own manual. Simple point-and-shoot camera, with the option for manual exposure control, a viewfinder, a single-element 103mm f/14.6 plastic lens and the option to attach an additional flashbar. Serial number is CNF728BE.

Polaroid Pronto! Sonar One Step Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap, that originally retailed for $99.95 and now usually sells for around $10. Item also comes with a Polatronic 5 flash(has its own manual) and a #2390, close up flash diverter. Electronic shutter speeds range from 1/4 to 1/200 sec, the aperture has a fixed setting F/9.4, there is autofocus with the sonar system and manual focus is possible. The lens is 3-element 116 mm plastic. Serial number is DJN830AA.

Polaroid Pronto! Sonar One Step Camera Special Edition

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap. Item comes with a manual, a Polatronic Flash(#2350)(has its own manual), to be used for pictures where the subject is less than 2 ft. away, and a flash adapter(#2352). There is an autofocus function, with the use of the sonar system and manual focus is possible. Serial number is DNK817A.

Polaroid Sun 640 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and a neck strap, that originally retailed for $70 and now usually sells for around $20. Features include a 116mm f/11 single-element plastic lens, with fixed focus (sharpest at 4-5 feet), an electronic shutter (speeds range from 1/4 to 1/200 sec, and an autoflash. It was one of the cameras that Polaroid made to enhance their 600 collection. Serial number is M1B76560NB.

Polaroid 640 Camera Special Edition

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and a neck strap, that usually sells for around $40. Features include a plastic lens, a viewfinder, a Sonar Autofocus system, autoflash and a manual lighten/darken control. Serial number is G1J73650NB.

Polaroid One Step 600 Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and a neck strap, that usually sells for around $30. It comes with a manual. Item is similar to the Amigo 620. The lens is 116mm f/9 3-element plastic, there is an automatic focusing system with the Polaroid Sonar AF system and minimum focus is 3ft. The shutter is electronic, with speeds ranging from 1/4 - 1/200 sec and photos are exposed automatically. Serial number is C6F17442NG.

Polaroid One Step Flash Camera (Black Bezel)

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap, that usually retails for around $10. Item has a built-in autoflash, a plastic lens, manual lighten/darken control and photos are exposed automatically. Serial number is F164815VH.

Polaroid EMS PhotoSystem Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera with a plastic body and neck strap, that usually retails for around $350. Item is similar to the Polaroid One Step Flash. This Polaroid camera was manufactured specifically for use by Emergency Medical Services use and the paint color and decals use fluorescence when hit with light to protect the photographer during night shooting. It is the only Polaroid camera to receive these special effects. Item has a built-in autoflash, a plastic lens, manual lighten/darken control and photos are exposed automatically. Serial number is E2621583NJAB.

Polaroid SX70 Alpha 1 Special Edition Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera, that now usually sells for around $100. Quite similar to the Polaroid Alpha 1. The lens is 4-element glass, 116 mm, f/8, with a manual distance setting and a minimum focusing distance of 26 cm. There is manual lighten / darken exposure control and the model has "fill-flash" capability (using Flashbars). Serial number is 5F820239407.

Polaroid Spectra Camera First Edition (Black)

Item is a Polaroid instant camera, with a plastic body and hand strap, that usually sells for around $115. Features include: a 25mm f/10 3-element Quintic lens, a self-timer, an optional flash button, photos are exposed automatically, sonar autofocus, sound, a manual lighten/darken option and a remote control option. Serial number is C670U70FND.

Polaroid Spectra Camera First Edition (Champagne)

Item is a Polaroid instant camera, with a plastic body and hand strap, that usually sells for around $140. Features include: a 25mm f/10 3-element Quintic lens, a self-timer, an optional flash button, photos are exposed automatically, sonar autofocus, sound, a manual lighten/darken option and a remote control option. Serial number is L6525V7JNA.

Minolta Instant Pro Camera

Item is a Minolta instant camera, with a plastic body and hand strap, that now usually sells for around $20. Similar to the Spectra Pro Camera. Features include: a self-timer, electronic flash, autofocus and manual exposure adjustment. Serial number is H0Z01GGLVD.

Polaroid Captiva SLR Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera, with a plastic body and a neck strap. Features include: a built-in electronic flash, manual lighten/darken exposure control, and a self-timer. Lens is an autofocus single-lens reflex LR 107 mm f/12, made of 3 element plastic, and the shutter is electronic with speeds ranging from 1/4 to 1/180 sec. There is an automatic focus with 2 focusing zones and a minimum of 2 feet. After being taken, pictures are ejected into a see-through "storage chamber" in the back of the camera, where they can stay or removed at any time. Serial number is H3L*3562NAFA.

Polaroid I-Zone Digital Combination Camera

Item is a Polaroid instant camera, with a plastic body, that originally retailed for $99.95 and now usually sells for around $10. This camera is based on the original I-Zone. This camera was marketed towards younger users and as a result, was quite easy to use. It had three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After the photo was captured, the lever would revert to the off position to save power. There is also a built in automatic flash unit that works on an as needed basis. Lens is a 7mm single-element plastic lens with a fixed focus, shutter is mechanical with a single-speed, there is 1MB flash RAM for memory, which can store a maximum of 18 pictures, and the viewfinder is optical only. Serial number is K120DC.

Pantages Theatre

Two archival photographs of the hall and auditorium, taken of the Pantages ca. 1920 and detail photographs of the theatre's restoration in 1989, including plaster mouldings and frescos. The cover image from the October 1989 issue (also of the Pantages Theatre ceiling) is not present in the file.

Spalding-Smith, Fiona

Posluns house

Single-family dwelling. Exterior views of brick and wood home in landscaped property; interior views of living room.

Jowett, Henry Roger

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