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image making equipment
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Kodak Monitor Six-20

Item is a folding Roll film camera for 620 film. Viewfinder on top, with Kodamatic flash shutter and synchron contact. Kodak anastigmat 4.5 105mm coated lens. The Monitor was also manufactured for 616 film. Item has a homemade leather case.

Minolta - 16 EE

Item is a subminiature camera with Rokkor F2.8/25mm lens, which used 9mm proprietary cassette film. This model of the Minolta 16 line features a selenium light meter and shutter-priority automatic exposure.

Kodak Canada Corporate Archives and Heritage Collection

  • SC 2005.001
  • Arquivo
  • 1895-2006

The Kodak Canada collection contains records and artifacts from the Kodak Heights manufacturing facility in Toronto, as well as the historical collection belonging to the Kodak Heritage Collection Museum. The collection consists of photographs, negatives, advertising records, magazines, pamphlets, daily record books, recipe books, cameras and other photographic equipment produced by Kodak Canada Inc., or other Kodak plants around the world. The collection includes a small selection of financial records, blueprints for Kodak facilities in Canada, and other corporate ephemera, as well as photographs of events, buildings and individual employees that illustrate the social life of the company.

Kodak Canada Inc.

Bass Stereoscopic Photography Collection

  • 2018.09
  • Coleção
  • [ca. 1850 - ca. 1996]

The collection contains stereoscopic photographs, viewers, and cameras, collected by the donors between the 1970's and the 1990's and dating from the 1850's to the 1990's. Material includes a variety of viewers, cameras, photographs, and ephemera relating to three-dimensional photography.

Pathéscope Baby (9.5mm projector)

Item is a cast metal, 9.5 mm projector for motion picture film. Designed for home use. It has a manual crank to advance the film, and a plug for a projection bulb (105-120 volt). This item is intended for Pathé's proprietary 9.5 mm Pathé Baby film cartridges (the sprocket is centered in the middle of the film between each frame).

Pathescope

Pathéscope 200 B (9.5mm projector)

Item is a cast metal, 9.5 mm projector for motion picture film. Designed for home use, public performances and clubs, or instructional use in classrooms.
It has a 105-130 volt motor. The film gate can be opened to easily thread the film throughout the driving mechanisms. It uses 9.5 Pathé Baby Film (motor drive has centre sprocket)

This projector uses 300 ft. reels (instead of the smaller 9.5 mm cartridges).

Pathescope

DEKKO (9.5mm projector)

Item is a cast metal, 9.5 mm projector for motion picture film. Designed for home use. It has a manual crank to advance the film.

It is meant for small 9.5mm film reels or film cartridges, but users could buy attachments arms that fit 300 ft. reels.

Kodaslide Merit Projector

Item consists of a Kodaslide Merit Projector. It has a 5 inch f/3.5 Kodak Projection Ektanon Lens and uses a 150-watt, 120-volt lamp. It has been made to accept all standard 2 x 2-inch slides. As opposed to other projector models of the time that featured automatic changers that could hold multiple slides at a time, the Kodaslide Merit Projector used an earlier slide-feeding method of inserting each slide individually into the top of the unit.

Image Arts

Kodak Brownie Movie Projector Model I

Item consists of a Kodak Brownie Movie Projector, the first model. The projector was manufactured from October 1952 to February 1955. It is for 8mm film, has an f/2 lens, and a max reel of 200 ft. It originally marketed for $62.50. It has a brown metal and plastic body with a removable protective cover that has an operation manual laminated inside.

Image Arts

Griswold Film Splicer Model R-3

Item consists of a Griswold Film Splicer Model R-3 from Jefferson, New York. The serial number is 7065. It was made by Neumade Products Corp., New York, N.Y. Factory, Buffalo N.Y. The body is made of cast iron. For 35mm film.

Image Arts

Argus film splicer

Small grey metal splicer for cutting and rejoining 8 mm film strips for at-home editing. Remnants of film strips were found in the splicer along with a crumpled piece of paper with instructions for use.

Argus Camera Company

Cine-Kodak Duo Splicer outfit

Item consists of a Cine-Kodak Duo Spicer Outfit complete with film cement, containers, an envelope of mounting screws and strips of practice film, and splicer. Missing applicators. For 8mm and 16mm movies, buth sound and silent.

Image Arts

Kodascope Junior Film Splicing Outfit

Item consists of a Kodascope Junior Film Splicing Outfit for 8mm and 16mm film. Included are directions for splicing film, a brush, an applicator, a can of film cement, a jar of film cement, an empty jar, screws and splicer in a black and silver box.

Image Arts

Kodak 500 Projector

Item consists of a Kodak 500 Projector. It was the considered the most portable Kodak projector yet, weighing just over 4 kilograms and featuring a self-contained carrying case. This item has a Kodak Readymatic Changer system that could hold up to 36 slides, but the Kodak 500 Projector was also made with a metal automatic magazine changer that stored up to 30 slides, allowing purchasers to choose their preferred slide-handling system.

Image Arts

Kodak Complete Outfit of Transparent Oil Colors package

Item consists of a Kodak Complete Outfit of Transparent Oil Colours kit, including oil paints, Instructions for Using Kodak Transparent Oil Colors, and How to Use The Complete Outfit of Kodak Transparent Oil Colors, with a glass palette and application tools in a wooden case. They could be used for coloring contact prints and enlargements.

Image Arts

Kodaslide Projector Model 1A

Item consists of a Kodaslide Projector Model 1A. The item is an improved model of the Kodaslide Projector (produced 1937-1940), the first Kodak slide projector to project 50 x 50 mm glass-mounted transparency slides. Along with improvements made by the Kodaslide Projector Model 1 (produced 1939 to 1947), the first model to accept Kodachrome transparencies in Kodaslide Ready-Mount, the Kodaslide Projector Model 1A provided a sharper, brighter projection and featured a 150-watt lamp, a 4-inch Kodak Projection Ektanon f3.5 Luminized Lens, and single-element heat-absorbing glass as an added measure to help protect the transparency slides during projection.

Image Arts

Kodascope Eight Model 70

Item consists of a Kodascope Eight Model 70 8mm motion picture film projector. On the reverse, the projector has a dial for slower to faster projection, and a switch with options Off, Motor and Lamp. It has a grey metal body, and is for use with slow burning film only. On the front of the projector is a threading knob. It has a 1 inch f/1.6 lens.

Image Arts

Alfred Darling Cine Camera

Item is a 35 mm wooden box camera designed and built by the UK Manufacturer Alfred Darling. The model can be identified as a Darling product by the presence of the iconic AD logo engraved on multiple camera features, including the footage counter and the interior wooden panels.
The English-pattern cinema uses a hand-wound two-sprocket claw mechanism to advance the film and a variable speed shutter that allows for continuous or single-frame shots. This item also has a glass pressure plate, which allows the user to focus directly on the film by looking through the rear focus tube. The wooden mahogany body has a leather strap on top and a tripod mount at the base of the device. This model has two internal stacked 300’ wooden box magazines. Other technical features include a footage counter and a level on top of the camera that allowed for a balanced shot when using a tripod.
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Motion-picture viewers

Series contains cameras that use film to capture moving images for display. While still image cameras expose one image at a time on photographic film, motion picture cameras take a series of images (or frames) on long strips of film that are then played back using a projector. The speed at which the film is projected matches that which it was taken, a speed (or frame rate) of 24 frames per second was long the standard in the motion picture industry, and is enough to appear to the human eye as motion and not simply a string of still images. Most of the cameras in this series are for amateur or "home movie" use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Kodak Brownie Holiday Flash camera

Item is a brown bakelite box camera designed by Eastman Kodak employee Arthur H. Crapsey Jr. for use with 127 film (4x6 cm exposures). The camera features a fixed speed rotary shutter and plastic lens. Item does not include the flash unit. This model was made in Canada, at the Canadian Kodak plant in Toronto.

Marion & Co. 5x7 Tailboard Camera

Item is a wood and brass folding field camera, for 4¾" × 6½" (120 × 165) or half-plate exposures on glass plates. Camera bellows are red leather and square cornered. The lens is a J.H. Dallmeyer rectilinear lens, dated 1889, with the serial number 49700.

Marion & Co.

Wray Stereo Graphic camera & viewer

Item is a stereographic camera for dual 24x23mm exposures on 35mm film. The camera was originally produced by the Graflex company (from 1955), sold under the Wray name beginning in 1959, with lenses produced by the optical company. The lenses are fixed-focus with aperture options from f4-f56.

The Sanderson Hand and Stand Camera, Regular model

Item is a black leather-covered wooden folding 5" x 4", or quarter plate, camera. The camera has red leather, diagonal cornered bellows, Bausch and Lomb Automat shutter, and BECK 7" Convertible Double Aplanat lens. The ring-shaped clamp dates the model to 1907.

Houghtons Ltd.

Heritage Camera Collection

  • 2005.006
  • Coleção
  • [between ca. 1860 and 2010]

The Heritage Camera Collection is comprised of cameras, mainly from the Wilhem E. Nassau Camera Collection, the Irving G. Rumney fonds, and several other small, individual donations.

This collection traces the evolution of the tools of popular photography from the turn of the nineteenth century to the current digital age. Many of the cameras were manufactured by Kodak Canada or Eastman Kodak, but there are also examples from many other manufacturers, such as: Ernst Leitz, Minox, Polaroid, Nikon, Rollei, Mamiya, Olympus, Contax, and several companies that pre-date, and were eventually amalgamated into Kodak, including the Rochester Optical Company.

Items in the collection are arranged in series according on their form and function; the categories are based on the research and publications of Michel Auer and Todd Gustavson, and often overlap chronologically.

Series are as follows:

Early cameras
Dry plate cameras
Field cameras
Folding (bellows) cameras
Box and snapsot roll film cameras
Detective cameras
Panoramic cameras
Miniature and sub-miniature cameras
Single lens reflex cameras
Twin lens reflex cameras
35mm cameras
In-camera processing (instant) cameras
Point and shoot caemras
One-time-use cameras
Digital and pre-digital cameras
Toy and promotional cameras
Motion-picture cameras
Video cameras

To browse the series, click on the "View the list" link under the "See the sous-fonds, series or sub-series lists for this collection" title (to the right of the page).

Stereoscopic and multi lens cameras

Series contains cameras that have with more than one lens, to create multiple images on the same light sensitive film or plate. These cameras were designed for several purposes, the most popular being the stereoscopic, or three-dimensional, image. Most stereo cameras work by taking two simultaneous images from slightly varying points of view that correspond to the distance between the human eyes. The images are then mounted side-by-side and viewed through a stereoscope (a system of two lenses that helps to converge the two photographs, to mimic the depth perception of binocular vision). Other three-dimensional cameras used four or more lenses to create images for lenticular prints.
Some multi-lens cameras were intended to create multiple copies of the same scene at one time, such as the gem tintype camera and passport camera, while others had shutters that took sequential shots to create images which show the passage of time on one frame.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Miniature and sub-miniature cameras

This series contains cameras designed to take photographs on flexible film sized smaller than 135 format film (24mm x 36mm). The size of the camera also tended to be very small, and often simply designed. While several companies manufactured high quality miniature cameras (including Minox and Rollei), many others were cheaply made and did not produce relatively poor results.

Film formats for miniature cameras were often priority, created by manufactures for their cameras specifically, and included the following sizes: 10mm x 14xx (16mm film), 13mm x 17mm film (110 film cartridges), 14mm x 14mm (used by "Hit" type cameras), 8mm x 11mm cartridge roll film (Minox), 11mm x 8mm disc film (Kodak).

Miniature cameras gained a reputation as "spy" cameras, and while some of the higher quality ones (including the Minox) were used by government agencies, most were simply for surreptitious, amateur use.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Folding (bellows) cameras

This series contains cameras designed for roll film and employed a folding design, in which a front flap opened and lens and bellows extended from the camera body. This design balanced the need to produce large sized negatives while making the cameras smaller, and more convenient than the box format cameras. Many were variations on the basic Kodak design that, when folded, resembled a long, flat box with rounded ends. Both brilliant viewfinders and optical direct finders were used in these designs and lenses were generally more advanced than the simple box cameras, with shutter speed and focus adjustments possible.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Field cameras

This series contains view cameras whose lighter and more compact design, as compared to larger, studio style cameras, allowed for them to be easily transported for use in outdoor settings and for travelling. Alterations like collapsible bellows (folding into either the back of the camera, the front or both), smaller lenses, and folding bodies allowed for the camera to be collapsed for easier movement. The advent of pre-prepared photographic dry plates (and later sheet film). further facilitated landscape and other outdoor photography.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

English wood and brass field camera

Item is a wood and brass folding field camera, likely of English manufacture, for (3 1/4" x 4 1/4") or "quarter plate" exposures on glass plates. Camera is a landscape orientation, bellows are extended and clipped in place with keyhole slugs and focused using twin tracks. The fixed lens board has a mounted f8 brass Taylor Taylor and Hobson brass lens with no shutter.

Perken, Son & Rayment field camera

Item is a wood and brass folding field camera, for 4 1/4" x 3 1/4" or quarter-plate exposures on glass plates. Camera bellows are extended and clipped in place with a keyhole slug and focused using a track. The removable lens board has a mounted f6 brass Perken, Son & Rayment lens with no shutter.

German tailboard camera with Rodenstock Bistigmat lens

Item is a wood and brass folding tailboard field camera, likely of German manufacture, for 18 x 13 cm (7" x 5") exposures on glass plates. Camera is equipped with square bellows, hinged ground glass focusing screen, and no shutter. Bellows are secured with pins, when extended, inserted into keyhole slots. The slide out lens board has a Rodenstock Bistigmat 13 x 18 lens with rotating aperture wheel. The camera is equipped with 2 plate holders for use with 18 x 13 cm (7" x 5") glass plates, with a wooden adapter insert to hold smaller 12 X 9 cm (3.75" x 2.5") plates.

English wetplate tailboard camera

Item is a wood and brass folding tailboard wet plate field camera, likely of English manufacture, for 10.7 x 8.2 cm (3 1/4" x 4 1/4") or "quarter plate" exposures on glass plates. Camera is a landscape orientation with square bellows, hinged ground glass focusing screen, and no shutter. Bellows are extended by twin tracks. The slide out lens board has a mounted brass lens, of unidentified manufacture, with rotating aperture wheel and leather lens cap.

The camera is very similar in design to a 1/4 wet plate camera model designed by W. Morley, London, but does not have the identifying makers marks.

Folding Filma camera

Item is a black leather covered folding camera with leather bellows, for exposures on 120 roll-film. Camera has a Marvel shutter with 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, B and T settings, an aperture range from6 6-45, and a brilliant viewfinder. A focus guide plate from 5 feet to infinity is mounted on the camera rail.

Le Glyphoscope stereographic camera and viewer

Item is a stereographic camera for dual exposures on 45x107mm glass plate negatives. This camera is missing the front lens plate and back plate, which were removable for the camera to function as a stereoscopic viewer as well.

Ensign Midget Model 22

Item is black, pressed steel, miniature folding camera for 1¼" x 1⅝" exposures on E10 film. The camera has a fixed focus lens and rotary shutter, the faceplate has a stripped geometric design. The model numbers on the Ensign Midget corresponded with the original sales price, with this model costing 22 shillings when manufactured.

Ensignette No.2

Item is a black painted brass body folding camera for 3" x 2" exposures on Ensign 2E roll film. The camera has black cloth bellows and a waist level brilliant viewfinder. This model has a brass body and wheel stop aperture dating it from prior to 1920, when the company switched to aluminum.

Kodak No. 2 Hawkette

Item is a brown Bakelite folding camera with cloth bellows, for 2 ¼" x 3 ¼" exposures on 120 roll-film. Camera is fixed focus, and has a rotating brilliant viewfinder, for landscape and portrait orientation. According to David Purcell, this model was produced in the UK for product giveaways schemes and not available for direct sale.

Kodak Limited (England)

No. 3 Folding Brownie Model C

Item is a black imitation leather-covered wooden folding camera for 3 1/4 x 4 1/4" exposures, on No. 124 film. The camera has red cloth bellows and was originally priced at $9.00 USD.

Eastman Kodak Company

No. 3A Autographic Kodak Model C

Item is a black leather-covered folding camera for 3 ¼" x 5 ½" exposures on 122 roll film. The camera has black cloth bellows and brilliant viewfinder. The original sale price of the camera was $50.50 USD.

No. 2 Folding Autographic Brownie Camera

Item is a black bellows and leather covered folding camera, for 2¼×3¼ " exposures on No. 120 Autographic film. This later model has a shutter with speeds of B, T, 1/25 sec., 1/50 sec.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

No. 1A Autographic Kodak Camera

Item is a black bellows and leather covered folding camera, for 2.5" x 4.25" exposures on No. A116 Autographic film. The camera features a Kodak Anastigmat f7.7/130 mm lens and a ball bearing shutter.

Ensignette No.1

Item is a folding camera for 1 1/2 x 2 1/4 inches (3.8 x 5.7 cm ), exposures on Ensign E1 or Eastman Kodak no. 128 size roll-film. The camera has black leather bellows and a waist level brilliant viewfinder. This model, with two medallions on the front plates, was manufactured in 1911 or later (earlier versions had plain front plates).

Nassau History of the Camera Collection

  • 2020.006
  • Coleção
  • 2020

This collection contains cameras and photographic equipment that outline the history of image-making technology. The collection was assembled by the donor for educational purposes and as a museum exhibition for the City Museum of Warleroo entitled Thru the Lens. The collection also contains research notes and teaching material to accompany items in the collection.

Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic

Item is a folding trellis strut camera from the Vest Pocket series for 4.5 x 6 cm (1.77" x 2.36") exposures on 127 roll film. Lens is a Kodak Anastigmat 84mm f4.7, with a ball-bearing shutter with B,T, 1/25, 1/50, etc.. A case in included.

Kodak Bullet

Item is a small hand held camera with black plastic and metal casing. Winding knob on bottom left and metal latch for attaching a flash on top (no flash included). Around lens opening, "BULLET CAMERA" is printed. Designed in art deco style.

Eastman Kodak Company

Ken Van Velzer Polaroid Collection

  • 2018.10
  • Coleção
  • [1910-2000?]

The collection contains Polaroid cameras and accessories. Material includes a variety of cameras, containers, parts and ephemera relating to Polaroid photography

"Pictures taken with Kodaks" (wooden folding advertisement)

Item consists of a standing, yellow painted wooden, 4-section frame containing 16 photographs taken with Kodak cameras and printed on Kodak papers. Each image lists the camera that was used to take the photograph, along with the name of the paper it was printed on. Cameras include Baby Brownie, Six-20 Duo, Six-20 Junior, Six-16 Kodak, the Retina, and the Jiffy Kodak VP.

Argoflex EF

Item is a metal twin lens reflex camera for 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" exposures on 620 format roll film. Coupled front lens focusing.

Argus C3

Item is a 35mm camera. Very solid and durable design, similar to the box camera.

Argus A2F

Item is a 35 mm cartridge camera with a bakelite body and an Argus Anastigmat f4.5/50 mm collapsible lens. This particular model comes with an extinction meter and features close focusing to 15".

Argoflex E

Item consists of an Argus Argoflex E twin-lens reflex camera made in the U.S.A. It was the first 620 film TLR camera produced by Argus. The camera features gear-coupled lenses allowing the user to focus using the viewfinder, an f4.5/75mm Argus Varex Anastigmat lens, and an Argus Varex Shutter with speeds T, B, 200, 100, 50, 25 and 10. Exposures are 6x6. The body is made of black Bakelite.

Kodak Self Timer

Item is a small metal timer for taking photographs without having to be near the camera to release the shutter. A cable release is placed into the top of the device, with a plunger that is pushed down realizing the shutter when it pops back up.

Eastman Kodak Company

Rolleiflex Old Standard

Item consists of a twin-lens reflex camera for 6 x 6 cm exposures on 120 film. Contains a Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f4.5/75 mm lens and a Heidoscop-Anastigmat f3.1/75 mm lens and a Compur shutter.The camera has a Carl Zeiss Jena lens cap.

Rolleicord II Model 3

Item consists of a twin-lens reflex camera. The camera includes a f3.5/75 mm Carl Zeiss Jena Troitar lens and a Heidoscop Anastigmat lens. The shutter is a Frankes & Heidecke Compur shutter. Item comes with a black metal lens cap.

Reversible Back Premo camera

Item is a folding field camera for exposures on 8x10 plates, manufactured by the Rochester Optical and Camera Company. Wood camera with red bellows and brass hardware. Created for advanced amateur and professional photographers, the back was reversible to allow the photographer to photograph in both landscape and portrait orientations and had adjustable tilt to account for distortion. Includes a Ross f8-64 lens.

J. Lizars Challenge camera

Item is a luxury wood and brass, self casing folding plate camera with red bellows. Front plate has full tilt, shift and swivel capabilities. Equipped with a 10 1/4 in F 11 Ross lens. Serial # 90191.

Graflex RB Series D

The Graflex RB is a single-lens reflex camera, the last of the family of field cameras known as "Graflex cameras", in contrast to the "Graphic" Graflex cameras. This model was produced between 1928-1947. It features a rotating back (abbreviated to RB), 4" x 5" plate holder, a light-excluding focusing-hood, interchangeable film holders, extensible lens with hood, and a f/4.5 anastigmat lens with a focal length of 7-1/2 inches (190mm), and is is designed to be held at waist height for use. The Graflex was used in the USA Navy and favoured for its ability to capture outdoor and action scenes. The aperture and tension can be adjusted according to the shutter speed plate, a table mounted on the side of the camera indicating adjustments. The Graflex RB series D is composed of straight-grain Honduras mahogany covered with black Morocco leather and chrome details.

This camera is accompanied by a carrying case of wood, black leather, and green felt. It contains one camera instruction manual: "Instruction manual for Graflex Cameras: RB Super D & RB Series B: Also Earlier Models including Series B, RB Series D, Auto, RB Auto, Auto Jr., RB Tele & RB Jr." It also contains 7 film holders and one replacement rotating back. The back piece is inscribed with: "Graflex Cute film Magazine: Pat Sept 7, 1920 Other Patents Pending: Made in U.S.A. by Folmer Graflex Corporation Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A., 43. For use of this alternate back, the camera back must be removed and rotated.

Toy and promotional cameras

Series contains cameras designed for children or created and distributed as marketing materials for different corporations. These cameras became most popular after the advent of film cartridges, as this greatly simplified the handling and lowered the cost. These cameras are predominantly inexpensive and simply designed, without features that allow the photographer to change aperture or shutter speed.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

One-time use cameras

Series contains cameras designed to be disposable. Usually simple, point and shoot cameras made of plastic cases with cardboard housings, these cameras were sold pre-loaded with film and returned to the photofinisher in tact for development. The plastic bodies were often returned to the manufacturer and re-used, with film and housing. Cameras such as this were marketed for travel, weddings, underwater or other situations where a more expensive camera may get damaged. They were available in different film speeds and some models included a flash.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

35mm cameras

Series contains cameras designed for use with standard 35mm (135 format) film. This became the most popular film and camera format, both among professionals and amateurs. Sturdy and multi-functional, with interchangeable lenses, these cameras found their way into civil wars, riots, and natural disasters around the necks of daring photojournalists as well as in homes and on vacation with advanced amateurs and photo-enthusiasts. Once exposed, the film was wound conveniently back into light-tight metal canisters that would protect the film until it could be developed.

For 35mm cameras marketed specifically to amateur photographers, see items in the Point-and-Shoot series.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Twin lens reflex cameras

Series contains cameras designed with two identical lenses, mounted one above the other, for composition and the other for exposure. The twin-lens design allows the photographer a continuous view of the subject while photographing, as the 45 degree angled mirror is mounted to the viewing lens only and therefore does not have to list out of the way during exposure, as in single lens reflex designs. Most designs used a waist level viewfinder with a ground glass.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Single lens reflex cameras

Series contains single lens reflex, or simply reflex, cameras. This deign used a mirror at a 45 degree angle to allow the photographer to look through the lens when composing the photograph, therefore seeing exactly what will appear on the film. Brilliant and sports style viewfinders only alllowed an approximation of the image alignment.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Detective cameras

Items in this series are photographic devices designed to be inconspicuous, intended for photographers to make candid exposures without the subject being aware. The first detective cameras appeared with the production of commercially available dry plates and designs were simple box camera style constructions. These were, in fact, very similar to standard cameras of the time, but were smaller, handheld and able to make exposures relatively quickly. As smaller, flexible film materials became available, these cameras began to be produced disguised as objects such as pocket watches, ties, books, hats, pens and walking sticks.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Scovill & Adams Company

Box and snapshot roll film cameras

Series contains simple, snapshot cameras designed for mass public consumption, taking advantage of the new flexible roll film that was developed in 1883. The box camera was a logical follow up from the original simple camera obscuras, often having only one shutter speed, simple lenses with minimal f-stop capabilities and manual winds.

The trend arguably began with George Eastman's in 1888 with the first, amateur, handheld camera, "The Kodak", which came pre-loaded with 100 exposures. After exposure, the entire outfit was returned to the Eastman Kodak company, where the film was developed, prints made and sent back to the customer with the camera, now re-loaded with more film.

Many millions of similar cameras were sold, both high and low end, manufactured by different companies and eventually developing into the modern point-and-shoot camera.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Dry plate cameras

This series contains cameras designed for use with commercially manufactured dry plate negatives. Produced between about 1880 and 1900, these cameras began to be marketed to amateur photographers due to the relative ease of using dry plates. Exposure times shortened, necessitating faster shutters, within the lens or camera. The equipment also became more compact, allowing for hand-held photographs.

To browse the individual items in this series, click on the "View the list" link under the "File and item records are available for this series" title (to the right of the page).

Ansco Cadet Camera Outfit

Item is an Ansco Cadet 127 roll film camera with flash unit. The design of this camera was made to compete with the Kodak Brownie Star series, including similar three-point flash contacts. The camera features an Anscar Lens and a dial to switch between black and white and colour. The body is black plastic.

View-Master

Item is a handheld view master manufactured by Sawyer's Inc and first introduced at the New York World Fair (1939-1940). Item is made of plastic and metal. Reel of 7 diametrical, 16 mm colour transparencies of famous landmarks in British Columbia, Canada. The lever on the side of the viewer will rotate the reel one frame at a time once pressed. Reels are interchangeable and come with a variety of themes.

Kodak No. 2 Brownie Model F (Red)

Item consists of a snapshot box camera for use with 120 film. The camera body is card with a red leatherette covering. The Brownie No. 2 Model F was manufactured between April 1929 and 1933, and was available in a variety of colours, including red.

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited

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